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« Nick Bostrom on the Simulation Argument | Main | A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton »

August 26, 2011

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David Kraftsow

I was reminded of this documentary on language's influence on color perception:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b71rT9fU-I

Thanks for an interesting interview!

Jim Vaughan

I love this thought experiment! It was great to hear Frank Jackson talking about it to Nigel, including his conversion to representationalism.

However, wouldn't Phenomenology be a more logical step?

Merleau-Ponty would have loved Marys Room. He tried to describe our actual embodied perception, for which science is a reduced epistemology when it comes to understanding our actual experience of the World.

Sure, we form representations in our head, but only on reflection, not in our pre-reflective coping with the world, which we do without thinking? Significantly, this has been bourne out by the failure of AI which attempted use symbol systems and rules. And the role of qualia? It is to call our attention to the smell of food, or a beautiful blond, or the call to write a revolutionary idea with the pen on the page, which no representationalist system can do. It is to feel something as true or false, which becomes meaningless in purely physicalist terms. Just another combination of neurones firing. Merleau-Ponty's Chiasm is the synthesis of Phenomenology and Science.

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